Friday, April 20, 2018

Searching For Manna, Part 3

Part 1

Ruth crossed the street toward the house. It was "The Greatest Christmas Spectacle Ever," a place owned and run by Bob Fletcher. He and his wife had been accumulating Christmas decorations for years. The lights on the house blinked intermittently. Across the sky, above their heads, a plastic Santa in a plastic sleigh pulled by plastic reindeer moved back and forth on a cable strung from the roof of the house to a utility pole across the street. When it moved forward, the light was on, giving Santa a jolly-red glow. When it reached the utility pole and began to move backward to the roof, the light went off.

Ruth stopped with her shins touching the rope of red bows tied to candy canes that kept people from walking across the Fletcher's yard. Maybe they didn't want footprints mucking up the snow. The yard was divided into sections and cluttered with plastic statues and mechanical dolls. There was a fake pond with fake skaters who spun and moved in figure eights and sang "Winter Wonderland." There were polar bears, and four different manger scenes, one of which had three wise men that actually walked and pointed at the Star of Bethlehem overhead. Each of the trees and bushes had a different theme. One was wrapped in white lights with yellow bows and had a sign hanging from it which read, pray for Peace." Another was covered with big primary colored light bulbs and had all of the Disney characters hanging from it. Mickey was Santa, and Goofy was an elf.

Ruth thought it must cost hundreds of dollars in electricity alone to make this place run. She wondered if the light made it hard for them to sleep. Maybe they had black shades to pull over the windows and keep the light out. Ruth looked at one of the windows. Instead of seeing black shades, she saw directly into their dining room. It was gold colored. They must have just finished dessert, she thought. It occurred to her that the music must be bothersome too.

She thought about the endless tangles in the hundreds of feet of cord that powered this spectacle, imagining trying to find the one burnt bulb that kept the peace tree from lighting and cut the electricity off from two of the manger scenes. Ruth wondered what the yard looked like when the sun was out and there wasn't any snow. She could picture the orange heavy-duty extension cords that bound the trees and wove through the grass like poisonous snakes. Perhaps the whole thing became a giant electrical field when it rained or snowed. That's the real reason for the red­ ribbon, Ruth thought.

Next to the parking lot, across the road from the Fletcher house was what looked like a little shrine. Ruth walked to it. There were hundreds of pictures taped to it, pictures of people-­singles, couples, families--all of them standing with their arms across Mr. Fletcher's shoulder. Ruth had left her camera at home. It just as well, she thought, it's late. She tried to imagine their picture on the wall--Ruth and her mom with their arms around Mr. Fletcher's shoulder, and her dad standing behind, all of them grinning like the people in the other pictures.

On the ledge inside the stand, there was a painted coffee can with a sign that read, "Please donate to make the Fletcher's display an annual tradition." Ruth wondered how many coffee cans full of money it took to cover the electrical bill. Next to the can was a register for all of the guests who had visited "The Greatest Christmas spectacle Ever." There were names from as near as Letts and Madison and as far as Ohio, Illinois, and even California and Maine. It occurred to Ruth that this place was a beacon that drew people out of the dark, if only for a moment.

She turned back toward the car. Her mom was standing next to it smoking a cigarette. She didn't see her dad.

"What do you think?" Ruth's mom asked.

"It's something."

"It sure is." Her mom looked up toward the giant star which flashed over the house and exhaled a stream of smoke which concealed itself in the whiteness of her breath.

Ruth and her mother didn't make eye contact. They both wondered how long he would take. They'd been there for nearly thirty minutes. The wind began to bite them through the layers of clothing they were wearing. Ruth got into the car, turned the ignition, and flipped the heat to high. They sat in the front seat, waiting for it to warm up. Ruth began to consider the possibilities. He probably got lost on the way back from the port-a-let or forgot where they parked. Or maybe he slipped and hit his head and was bleeding to death somewhere in the woods. The idea intrigued her. Maybe he was dead. A part of her hoped that it was true. She wanted to leave. She was tired of waiting.

"Do you think he's coming back? It's been almost an hour."

"I don't know."

Ruth couldn't tell if her mom was scared, sad, or relieved. "I guess I should go look for him, huh?"

"I'll go with you." Ruth's mom said pulling her white glove back onto her hands and buttoning the one button on her dress coat.

"No, you're not dressed for it."

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